SOUTHERN AMENDMENT Just as she’s always done, Erica Sunshine Lee mixes her southern roots country with power chords and power lyrics in her latest EP “Southern Amendment”.

This, Lee’s fifth studio album, may only be a five song EP, but every song on it is worth two in today’s world of female-less country music. Her hard-hitting lyrics mixed with attitude and fun make Lee one of the most successful independent female artists in country music. In 2014, she was named Georgia’s Female Artist of the Year, and this EP only justifies that accolade.

The first track of Southern Amendment is “Mud on My Boots”, a girl-gone-bad song of which many females can relate. The lyrics tell the story of a woman who finds her man and another woman cheating, but rather than be angry at her boyfriend/husband, she takes her anger out on the woman. “There’s two more bricks at the bottom of the lake…I got mud on my boots, blood on my hands, ain’t nobody gonna take my man” suggests she has given the woman a pair of new shoes – of the cement brand. Later in the song we learn she was caught in the act, and met her maker at the end of a 9-mm handgun before taking her final resting spot at the bottom of the lake.

The next song tells of a love on the rocks, but Lee is fighting to keep her love alive as much as the couple is fighting with one another. Becoming “Another Sad Love Song” is the where the relationship is headed, but not if she can help it. The lyrics take over in this one, and they don’t disappoint, “Here we go again, breaking up and then make amends. Knuckles turning white, I’m holding on for dear life…” hints that she’s holding on as tight as rodeo cowboys do their bulls. Based on the fact nobody thinks they’re gonna make it, if the love lasts longer than 8 seconds, she can call it a success.

Track 3 slows us way down, and Lee shows off her demanding vocals in “Leaving Atlanta”. Her smooth tone takes us on the trip from Atlanta to her destination in California. Her southern twang comes out most in the bridge, and the perfection is reminiscent of Sara Evans. This song keeps you coming back to it for those special vocals.

Picking up the pace a little bit in “Girls With Guns”, Lee takes us back to her attitude side. She really likes 9-mm handguns, apparently. “With aim like this, who needs mace?” Lee asks. I’m sure many women in the South can relate to their father teaching them to hunt and defend themselves. The guitar solo comes in just as the story progresses to someone breaking into the home, and the song climaxes when she gives the intruder one last warning:

“Don’t mess with Texas or girls with guns.” CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE...